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Classic Popular Cars from the 1960s

1961 Cadillac Sedan de Ville

This early decade de Ville was one of the last models to rock those taillight fins! And who could forget that bus-sized steering wheel? Plus, we couldn't have a classic car list without a pink Cadillac. Thanks, Elvis and the Freeway of Love!

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1961 Chevrolet Impala

This was the pinnacle of convertibles. Even the sedan models had "convertible roof" styling. America just couldn't resist the open road!

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1961 Ford Thunderbird

Ford's response to the Corvette was the 1961 Thunderbird, but it was still marketed as a "personal car" instead of a sportster. Eventually, this segment became the personal luxury car.

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1963 Chevy Corvette Stingray

The second generation of the Corvette became the most classic, with its fastback design and unique divided rear window. Thanks to its enduring popularity, Chevy even brought back the Stingray nameplate for its latest iteration of the Corvette.

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1964 Aston Martin DB5

It might not have been the first James Bond car, but it's surely the most famous thanks to Goldfinger. Can you name another 1960s car that has ingrained itself so deeply into popular culture?

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1964 Porsche 911 Classic

The 911 is still a current offering from Porsche, but it just doesn't quite live up to this classic 1964 design. The styling was just as home in your driveway as it was on the racing courses of Le Mans.

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1965 Chevrolet Bel Air

The full-sized Bel Air was completely restyled for the 1965 model year. The popular "bubbletop" design became boxier, then a growing trend for the traditional family car.

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1965 Ford Mustang

It's the car that started a movement. The Mustang was small and light but featured a powerful engine. Thus, the pony car was born. Costing around $2,400 in 1965, the Mustang would be about $19,000 in today's dollars—quite a bit cheaper than 2018's base model.

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1965 Jeep CJ-5

The CJ-5 (the original SUV before SUVs were cool) remained largely unchanged over the course of its 30-year run before being replaced by the modern Wrangler. You can still see the resemblance.

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1965 Lincoln Continental

It might seem large compared to today's compact cars, but the '65 Continental was actually the smallest Lincoln yet. It promoted its "agile" size by showing advertisements where a woman easily parallel parks.

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1965 Plymouth Barracuda

Chrysler's response to the success of the Mustang was this sporty two-door. The fastback design had a unique rear window that wrapped around the edges of the passenger cabin.

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1965 Shelby Mustang GT350

The '65 might be the smallest of the Mustang Cobras that were produced, but the Wimbledon white and racing stripes remain a classic design well into the modern today.

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1966 Alfa Romeo Spider

This cute little Italian roadster was the perfect car for puttering down a sunny beachside drive. While it was famous in car circles for its distinctive dovetail rear design, you will more likely remember Dustin Hoffman's running out of gas in The Graduate.

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1966 Buick Wildcat

This classic sedan, which also came in convertible iterations, features that distinctly Buick "sweepspear" design feature. It's that rub strip that runs the length of the vehicle from nose to tail. Look for it again in the Buick Riviera.

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1966 Oldsmobile Toronado

Oldsmobile's Toronado competed directly with the Ford Thunderbird in the newly minted personal luxury car segment. The distinct sporty styling won it Motor Trend's coveted Car of the Year award in 1966.

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1966 Pontiac GTO

While it was introduced earlier, the '66 was the first year the Pontiac GTO was released as a standalone model. As tailfins from the 50s faded away, these Coke bottle design influences (arches around the back wheel well) replaced them.

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1967 Chevrolet Camaro

Chevy's Mustang competitor pulled out all the stops for its '67 debut. It wouldn't best the Ford in sales until 10 years later, but a rivalry was born.

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1967 Mercury Cougar

Mercury's '67 Car of the Year award-winner occupied a space in between the Mustang and the Thunderbird, featuring an "electric shaver grille" that concealed hidden headlamps.

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1967 Pontiac Firebird

The Pontiac Firebird was the Camaro's cousin and released around the same time as the Mercury Cougar. With signature Coke bottle styling, the Firebird gave rise to the now-famous Trans Am performance package.

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1968 Volkswagen Type 2

There are fewer automobiles that conjure up images of flower power and Hippie culture than the Volkswagen Type 2, affectionately called "VW Bus." This counterculture icon is actually an updated model from one produced during 1950-67. The major difference is a unified windshield instead of the older divided one.

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1968 Buick Riviera

GM joined Ford in the personal luxury car market with the '63 Buick Riviera. But it was the second generation of the car that modernized the Buick sweepspear and featured a unique horseshoe-shaped gear shift.

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1968 Chevrolet Chevelle SS

The second gen Chevelle SS truly embraced the car's inner hotrod. The Coke bottle styling of the body featured a distinct "kick-up," a high-rising flair where the trunk met the cabin body.

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1968 Ford Torino

The Torino covered all areas of automotive needs. The fastback and convertible designs competed with the likes of the pony cars, but it also featured a stain wagon design for the more practical, family-minded driver.

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1968 Jaguar E-Type

The British sports classic set the bar high when it came to beauty and performance. If you could afford a sports car during the 60s, this is the one you would get. Even Enzo Ferrari called it the most beautiful car ever made.

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1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

The Cutlass Supreme was Oldsmobile's cousin offering to the Chevy Chevelle; however, they were more luxurious with plush bench and bucket seats and a high-performance V8 package.

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1968 Volkswagen Beetle

Famously produced by the Germans beginning during World War II, The Beetle saw its greatest success in the U.S. during the 1960s. Essentially unchanged since its introduction, the Beetle is the best-selling single automobile design in history!

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1969 Dodge Charger

The Charger was introduced in '66, but the second generation redesign was where sales really increased. The 1969 model, in particular, would become iconic a decade after its production thanks to The Dukes of Hazzard.

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1969 Dodge Dart Swinger

While it was originally introduced as a full-size car in 1960, redesigns saw it downsize to an eventual compact offering, like the 1969 version. It was then that the "Swinger" moniker adopted for the 2-door hardtop (a replacement for the discontinued 2-door sedan).

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1969 Plymouth Road Runner

The performance-built mid-size car from Plymouth came on the scene in 1968, but 1969 was the year it won Motor Trend's Car of the Year award. The Air Grabber option was an important introduction to the model lineup that year.

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1970 Dodge Challenger

1970?! What gives?! Before we get tons of emails to the editor, remember that models are released before their actual model year. So this 1970 Challenger actually came out in 1969, just beating the decade cutoff, and giving Dodge its competitor to the Mustang and Camaro.

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